1. 30 Oct, 2017 2 commits
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  20. 13 Feb, 2017 3 commits
  21. 12 Feb, 2017 1 commit
    • Robbert Krebbers's avatar
      Make iSpecialize work with coercions. · f1b30a2e
      Robbert Krebbers authored
      For example, when having `"H" : ∀ x : Z, P x`, using
      `iSpecialize ("H" $! (0:nat))` now works. We do this by first
      resolving the `IntoForall` type class, and then instantiating
      the quantifier.
      f1b30a2e
  22. 23 Jan, 2017 1 commit
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  26. 28 Dec, 2016 1 commit
  27. 09 Dec, 2016 2 commits
  28. 24 Nov, 2016 1 commit
  29. 22 Nov, 2016 1 commit
    • Robbert Krebbers's avatar
      Make nclose an explicit coercion. · 274209c2
      Robbert Krebbers authored and Ralf Jung's avatar Ralf Jung committed
      We do this by introducing a type class UpClose with notation ↑.
      
      The reason for this change is as follows: since `nclose : namespace
      → coPset` is declared as a coercion, the notation `nclose N ⊆ E` was
      pretty printed as `N ⊆ E`. However, `N ⊆ E` could not be typechecked
      because type checking goes from left to right, and as such would look
      for an instance `SubsetEq namespace`, which causes the right hand side
      to be ill-typed.
      274209c2